The Memorial Wall · Parkinson's Resource Organization

Memorial Wall

Honoring Those Who Have Gone Before Us

Over the years, we at PRO have consistently been asked to create a special place to honor loved ones who’ve lost their battle with Parkinson’s – a place of remembrance and healing for those who are left behind. Our response is the Memorial Wall.

 

Recent Memorial Wall Additions

Dr. David Tayman

Dr. David Tayman

June 28, 2022 - May 28, 2022

Veterinarian, Dr. David Tayman passed away on Saturday, May 28, 2022, from complications of Parkinson's disease and COPD.

He was born on June 28, 1946 in Baltimore to parents, Oscar and Florence (Posner) Tayman, both of Baltimore. He is predeceased by his sister, Sharon Tayman Hackerman, and survived by his wife of 41 years, April, daughters, Elizabeth Shipe (Steven) and Jacqueline Wineke (A.J.), and four grandchildren, Penelope, Warner, Franklin, and Lena. David is also survived by his brother-in-law, Carl Hackerman, aunts, Beatrice Yoffe and Eva Tayman, as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins, and countless friends.

David attended City College High School in Baltimore, before heading to Michigan State University, where he obtained his undergraduate degree, and continued to receive his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine in 1969. After working in several animal hospitals, he opened Columbia Animal Hospital in Columbia, Maryland in 1974. Thereafter, he opened several other animal hospitals in the area. David served as president of the Maryland Veterinary Medical Association in 1986. He received several awards during his career, including Veterinarian of the Year in 2001.

In addition to his veterinary practice, David also served as a valued community leader, including membership on Howard County's Board of Health, Hospital Foundation, and Chamber of Commerce.

David was also involved in developing the PetSafe Program and the Mutt Mitt public health program, a system of stations around Howard County for pet waste disposal. Dr. Tayman followed a work philosophy of 'treat each pet as if it were your own,' a phrase imparted to him by a favorite professor.

David's favorite pastimes included wildlife photography, exercising at the Columbia Athletic Club, and spending time with his beloved family. He was loved and will be missed by many. 

Remembering Dr. David Tayman

Use the form below to make your memorial contribution. PRO will send a handwritten card to the family with your tribute or message included. The information you provide enables us to apply your remembrance gift exactly as you wish.

J. Joseph Grandmaison

J. Joseph Grandmaison

May 19, 1943 - June 11, 2022

J. Joseph Grandmaison, 79, of Portsmouth, NH, died June 11, 2022 from the effects of Parkinson’s disease.  Born May 19, 1943 as middle son of Oscar and Irene (Bouchard) Grandmaison, Joe served 2 years as Nashua’s Ward 7 Alderman and thereafter began a career in Democratic politics and government service including major roles in Sen. George McGovern for President 1972;  Michael Dukakis for Governor 1974;  Sen. John Glenn for President 1984;  and Gov. Bill Clinton for President 1992.

Joe was a proud member of Nashua High School’s Class of 1960, a graduate of Burdett College and a Fellow at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government-Institute of Politics.    He was his Party’s nominee for Congress in NH’s 2nd District in 1976 and for Governor in 1990.  Joe also served as Chairman of the NH Democratic Party and in the NH National Guard.  

In government service, Joe was named Federal Co-Chairman of the New England Regional Commission by President Carter; Director of the US Trade & Development Agency by President Clinton; and appointed twice to the Board of Directors of the Export-Import Bank by President George W. Bush.    

Joe was predeceased by his parents and brother Peter.    He is survived by his brother Philip and his wife Ann; nephew Adam and his fiancé Lena Nersesian and their daughter Parker Ann Grandmaison; and niece Sarah Manheim, her husband Josh and their sons Henry Joseph and Theodore Philip Manheim, all of California.

After residing in Washington, DC and Rye, NH for many years, Joe relocated to Wentworth Senior Living in Portsmouth in 2020.  Wentworth’s staff, Beacon Hospice’s staff and volunteers and care managers Anna Shultz and Carol  Sanderson provided him with comfort and love.    His career in public life enabled him to collect many friends who reached out to him in recent months to express their support and affection.

Remembering J. Joseph Grandmaison

Use the form below to make your memorial contribution. PRO will send a handwritten card to the family with your tribute or message included. The information you provide enables us to apply your remembrance gift exactly as you wish.

Ronald Wayne Fahey

Ronald Wayne Fahey

January 1, 1932 - May 26, 2004

Ronald Wayne Fahey passed away peacefully, surrounded by loved ones, in Santa Rosa, to join his parents Hansine and Michael on Wednesday, May 26, 2004 at the age of 72.

A native of San Francisco, he graduated from the University of San Francisco and Hastings Law School. He moved to Santa Rosa in 1964, worked as a district attorney for many years and later as a special prosecutor in high profile cases. He loved reading, driving, and listening to jazz. He was a US Navy Korean War Veteran.

He is survived by his brother Robert "Snook" Fahey, loving children Anne Schillings, Ronald W. Fahey, Jr., Michele Fahey, and four grandchildren.

Remembering Ronald Wayne Fahey

Use the form below to make your memorial contribution. PRO will send a handwritten card to the family with your tribute or message included. The information you provide enables us to apply your remembrance gift exactly as you wish.

Yves Coppins

Yves Coppins

August 9, 1934 - June 22, 2022

French paleontologist Yves Coppins, famous for discovering in Ethiopia in 1974 the skeleton of Lucy, the ancestors of humans dating back about 3.2 million years, the most famous Australopithecus afarensis, died today at the age of 87 after a long illness. Coppins is considered the “father of prehistory”, who revolutionized thanks to dozens of discoveries in paleobiology over the course of more than half a century. In October 2021, he organized a workshop on symbolism and the religious sense in man from the beginning at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, of which he has been a member since 2014.

He was Professor Emeritus of Ancient and Prehistoric Anthropology at the College de France, Director Emeritus of the Musée du Manne in Paris, and a member of scientific institutions around the world, including the Royal Academy of Sciences, the European Academy, the Royal Belgian Academy, the National Academy of Sciences in Rome and the Institut Royal Anthropology.

Born in Vans on August 9, 1934, Coppins began his research first in Brittany while in high school and then at the Sorbonne in Rennes in Paris, where he studied geology, zoology, botany, and palaeontology. In 1956 he joined the French National Center for Scientific Research and dealt with distant periods and distant countries, particularly the borders of the Third and Quaternary eras in the tropics of the Old World. Beginning in 1960, he organized important expeditions first on his own in Chad, then in international cooperation, in Ethiopia (Omo Valley and Afar Basin) as well as numerous expeditions in Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Mauritania, South Africa, Indonesia, the Philippines, China and Siberia. His research focused on the paleontology of vertebrates (proboscis, hippos), their formation and importance to paleoenvironments, climate, biology, as well as paleoanthropology. The fruit of those expeditions is remarkable: tens of tons of fossils including more than a thousand human remains which could have been studied with amazing results, shedding light on the history of the past ten million years. He is known for his hypotheses that highlight the interrelationships between human evolution and the evolution of the environment.

In 1969 Cobbins was called to the deputy director of the Museum of Man, who became its director in 1980 at the same time
To dedicate the Anthropology Chair to the National Museum of Natural History. Meanwhile, travel to the Omo River valley in Ethiopia, an important site for the discovery of ancient humans. At the request of Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, the British paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey organized an international expedition in which Yves Coppins participated, discovering the remains of Australopithecus Aethiopicos (2.5 million years ago).

Then the French scientist headed to Afar in eastern Ethiopia: in 1974 Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) was discovered with Maurice Tayeb and Don Johansson (USA). Lucy’s 52 bones (a human skeleton has 206) made it possible to reconstruct her weight, age, and movement and to discover that pre-humans walked and climbed trees. Lucy’s name comes from the Beatles song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,” whose tunes rang out in the field.

Over the years, Coppins has formulated hypotheses proposing an ecological explanation for the separation of Hominidae Panidae 8 million years ago (1983), another hypothesis that identified the first appearance of Australopithecines 4 million years ago (1999), and another hypothesis about the emergence of the genus Homo 3 million years ago (1975) . These three stages postulated by Coppins are connected vertically or transversely within real trees, and each creates the conditions for the next stage, while developing its own stock in an original and independent manner.

Drawing on the different speeds of development of biology and technology, Yves Coppins also explained how the acquired gradually prevailed over the innate, giving man freedom and responsibility, and why human evolution slowed and then stopped.

Remembering Yves Coppins

Use the form below to make your memorial contribution. PRO will send a handwritten card to the family with your tribute or message included. The information you provide enables us to apply your remembrance gift exactly as you wish.

Mohammad-Ali Karimkhani

Mohammad-Ali Karimkhani

January 1, 1950 - June 20, 2022

Top Islamic eulogist Mohammad-Ali Karimkhani died at his home in Tehran on Monday after years of suffering from Parkinson’s disease. He was 72.

Karimkhani was best well-known for the ritual song “A Piece from the Heaven” or “I Came, O King, Shelter Me” that he sang for Imam Reza (AS), the eighth Imam of the Shia.

Born in Narjeh, a village near the city of Qazvin, he was interested in attending religious rituals from childhood. In his youth, he moved to Tehran to receive education on Islamic eulogy from numerous masters in this field.  

“Since childhood, I recited the Quran and was interested in Islamic eulogy,” he once said in an interview.

“During adolescence, I also continued my performances in religious events and received a lot of praise from people. My father and grandfather all enjoyed good voices, but they never performed in any official ceremonies; thus, I’m a born singer,” he added.

He recorded several albums and gave numerous fine performances during religious ceremonies, however, he shot to fame by singing “I Came, O King, Shelter Me”.   

With contributions from composer Aria Aziminejad, he performed the piece with a poem from Habibollah Chaichian, who, in this poem, refers to Imam Reza (AS) as king. The composition features a helpless person begging for help from the Imam at his shrine.    

Karimkhani had even performed the song at several of his relatives’ wedding ceremonies, due to popular demand.   

Vocalist Homayun Shajarian used the melody of the song to record “Man Koja, Baran Koja”, from his album “My Iran”. Accordingly, he dedicated the song to Karimkhani.

Karimkhani and Aziminejad also teamed up for “The Drunkard Cupbearer” about Imam Hussein (AS) and the epic of Ashura.

He was extremely meticulous in selecting a poem for singing and used all the capability of his voice to perform each song. 

His care for exploiting the most appropriate dastgah in traditional Persian music for his performances played a pivotal role to make his works popular.

Remembering Mohammad-Ali Karimkhani

Use the form below to make your memorial contribution. PRO will send a handwritten card to the family with your tribute or message included. The information you provide enables us to apply your remembrance gift exactly as you wish.

The Memorial Wall is a virtual place to

  • Honor the diversity and rich legacies of the people we have already lost to Parkinson’s and demonstrate to the world the high human cost of this neglected disorder.  

  • Provide a place for the living to visit so they can gain solace and understanding around the battle of a loved one with Parkinson’s.

  • Serve as a memorial when the family prefers donations in lieu of flowers or tributes at anniversaries or other significant dates.

Our work to ensure no one is isolated because of Parklinson’s has always been a labor of love. The Memorial Wall is an extension of that lovea virtual place for love to gather, reminisce, celebrate, as well as a ‘show of force’ to remind the world what we’ve already lost to this hideous disease. 

 

Become a Memorial Wall Sponsor

Inclusion on the wall is free, but maintenance takes effort. Join our team of core supporters to build your own legacy and carry on the memories of those who have gone before us. Your sponsorship helps ensure we can continue providing the services, insight, and support that have helped so many on their journey. 

Presidential – $20,000

Hope – $15,000

Peace – $10,000

Angel – $5,000

Guardian – $2,500

Sustaining – $1,000

If you wish to honor your loved one and share your memories in a public fashion or establish a memorial event, such as a golf tournament, tennis tournament, or special award presentation in the name of the family or decedent, please complete this submission form or contact us at info@parkinsonsresource.org.

If you wish to honor your loved one and share your memories in a public fashion or establish a memorial event, such as a golf tournament, tennis tournament, or special award presentation in the name of the family or decedent, please complete this submission form or contact us at info@parkinsonsresource.org.

Contact Us

Address
Parkinson's Resource Organization
74785 Highway 111
Suite 208
Indian Wells, CA 92210

Local Phone
(760) 773-5628

Toll-Free Phone
(877) 775-4111

General Information
info@parkinsonsresource.org

 

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Updated: August 16, 2017